college brochures

December Haiku Share

This haiku appeared in a rengay I wrote over the summer, with Angela Terry and Julie Warther. It very closely reflects my life right now, as my youngest child puts the finishing touches on his college applications. Share a haiku about college, leaving home, autumn color, autumn in general, color in general, empty nests, or coffee. Or even tables.

college brochures
on the coffee table
autumn color

From “Grade Five Rapids”
A Hundred Gourds 2:1, December 2012

If you missed the initial post, click here to read about the month long haiku challenge I am holding right here on my blog this December.

evening fog

December Haiku Share

If you missed the initial post, click here to read about the month long haiku challenge I am holding right here on my blog this December. At this busy time of year, this is suppose to be a fun and easy way to share haiku you’ve already written.

My haiku for today is:

evening fog
the sound of geese
comes and goes

 

Multiverses 1.1, June 2012

Possible ways to take this: evening, part of the day, fog, weather words, sounds, geese, any kind of animal, autumn

milk moon

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 30

And I did it again! (Made it to the end of another daily PAD challenge.) Today’s prompt is by guest prompter Violet Nesdoly: write a milk poem. I decided to go with another moon haiku– why not?

milk moon
my newborn baby
stirs in my arms

“Moon” is still an autumn kigo technically, although “Milk Moon” was one of several names given to the May full moon by Native Americans, according to the Farmers’ Almanac.  More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

And stay tuned tomorrow for a new idea I had for daily December blog posts that involve my blog readers!

new moon

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 29

Today’s prompt by guest prompter Bonita Jones Knott: write a birth poem. This is sort of a birth poem– a renewal poem anyway:

new moon
starting over again
again

“Moon”, for whatever reason, is an autumn kigo, so autumn it is.  More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

earthshine

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 24

My favorite kind of prompt is one which prompts me to learn something new in order to write it.Today’s prompt, by Amanda Fall was of this type. The prompt was to write a poem with the title “The Truth about [blank]”. I immediately thought of the moon, and while googling some facts about the moon to make sure what I said was correct, I discovered this fascinating NASA article about earthshine. I have witnessed this phenomena in the past, and wondered about it– now I know!

This was the evolution of my haiku, from my first pass, through a 3rd version (which lost “the truth about” phrase entirely). I’m interested to see which version others prefer.

the truth
about the moon
reflected sunlight

earthshine
the truth
about the moon

earthshine
the dark side
of the moon

“Moon”, without a preceding modifying adjective,  is an autumn kigo. More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

breaking dawn

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 22

Today’s prompt ( by Brenda Bishop Blakely) is somewhat daunting: to write about paradise. A bit of a tall order, considering I have approximately 6 – 10 words to dedicate to the task. So I will just write about something nice I experienced this morning instead.

On this Thanksgiving, as on all other Thanksgiving, I like to pause to think about those things, both large and small, that I am grateful for. What comes into my mind immediately are family, friends, community, and the amazing world of nature in which we live. As I looked out my (second story) bedroom window this morning, I found myself almost eye-to-eye with a very large squirrel, who had climbed out to the outermost branches near the top of our Japanese maple. I’ve always marveled at the gravity-defying acrobatic feats of squirrels, but this was one of the most daring I had ever witnessed. The sight of an obviously well-fed squirrel balancing his considerable weight on pencil thin branches to eat the dried maple seeds that still clung to the branches made me smile. Perhaps I am anthropomorphizing a bit much to say the squirrel is grateful for the abundant seeds, nuts, and bulbs it readily finds in our yard, but it reminded me that in spite of obstacles, my family, along with all the fauna in our neighborhood, is pretty well provided for this Thanksgiving Day. Wishing everyone who celebrates it a very Happy Thanksgiving, and for those who don’t, a happy day of reflecting on gratitudes instead. In spite of the considerable rain, the bare tree branches, the seemingly never-ending piles of soggy leaves to rake, and the shorter days, November still has much to offer. I guess my idea of paradise, to get back to the prompt, is a world in which everyone gets what they need, including our animal friends.

 

breaking dawn
a gray squirrel balances
on bare branches

The closest I can find to “bare branches” in The Haiku Handbook is “tree leaves fall”, an autumn kigo. More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

autumn ginkgo

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 16

Today’s  guest prompt by Joseph Mills is to use the last line of the poem we wrote yesterday, to start our poem today. There is a pleasing symmetry to this. Here was my haiku from yesterday:

stealing color
from the sun
autumn ginkgo

And here’s my haiku for today, with shades of the Day 9 prompt woven in as well:

autumn ginkgo
only bare branches
after you’re gone

“Autumn leaves” is (still!) an autumn kigo.   It seems only fitting to write the second haiku, as we raked up the last leaves from the ginkgo yesterday. It was, as always, quite glorious last week with its golden leaves. More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.