starting over

December Haiku Share

Share a haiku about new beginnings, footprints or footsteps, morning, or tides.

starting over –
my footprints erased
by the morning tide

Frogpond 34:1, Winter 2011

If you missed the initial post, click here to read about the month long haiku challenge I am holding right here on my blog this December.

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Upcoming Publications

It’s been silent on my blog ever since the 31 prompters, 31 days challenge on NaHaiWriMo ended on August 31. That’s jointly due to the back-to-school busyness, and also to all the journals and contests that have their deadlines between August 15 and September 15. I can’t even think how many haiku, senryu, and rengay I must have submitted. But it all pays off in the end: I have works that will appear in the following publications this fall:

  • 2 haiku, plus a rengay with Kirsten Cliff, to appear in Aubrie Cox’s Every Road Takes Me to the Sea post
  • 1 haiku, to appear in Modern Haiku
  • 2 haiku, plus a rengay with Angela Terry and Julie Warther, to appear in Frogpond
  • 1 haiku, to appear in Acorn
  • 3 haiku, plus 3 rengay with Angela Terry and Julie Warther, to appear in A Hundred Gourds
  • an interview with Ina Roy and Andrea Heiberg, to appear on in our books
  • 2 haiku, to appear in tinywords
  • 1 haiku, to appear in Mariposa

Recent publications include:

Summer Publications

Ah, summertime. I’m busy writing rengays, haiku, a few haibun, and keeping submissions in the pipeline. I’m pleased to have work appearing in upcoming issues of the following:

 

  • Frogpond  35:2, Spring/Summer 2012 (1 haiku, 1 rengay, and 1 renray),
  • contemporary haibun online, July 2012 (3 haibun)
  • Prune Juice #9 , July 2012 (3 senryu)
  • Daily Haiku (my third batch of haiku for Cycle 13), beginning on July 15
  • A Hundred Gourds 1:4, September 2012 (3 haiku)
  • The Heron’s Nest, Volume XIV, Number 3, September 2012 (1 haiku)
  • LYNX, October 2012 (a rengay sequence, with Kirsten Cliff)

Basho’s Frogpond, Revisited

I had a real Basho moment today. I was walking the dog by the pond, when suddenly I heard a loud plop. My first thought was that someone had thrown a large rock into the pond, but looking around, I saw that pup and I were alone. Was it a frog? Not wanting puppy to go ballistic, I didn’t dare approach too close in case it was something he wanted to chase. All I saw were trailing ripples, and for the whole time I stood there, nothing emerged.

old pond
when I look again
only ripples

Haiku Registry Listing

The Haiku Foundation says that to request a listing in their Haiku Registry, you only need to be a poet who has “”published English-language haiku in an edited journal, either in print or online.” My first haiku publication (if you don’t count my early 5-7-5 attempts, and I don’t!) was in 2010, when a sequence of three Mother’s Day haiku I wrote appeared in a special section of the March/ April Sketchbook, followed later that year by my first non-kukai contest placement in World Haiku Review (August 2010), and publication in my first print journal in Riverwind 30 (October 2010).

But that wasn’t good enough for me. I wanted to feel like I “earned” my listing, and consequently set a personal goal for myself. To make sure it wasn’t just beginner’s luck, I decided that I would wait to apply to be listed until I was published twice in each of  three of my favorite journals: Frogpond, The Heron’s Nest, and Notes from the Gean, and also placed well in at least two international contests.

“starting over” appeared in the Winter 2011 issue of Frogpond, and two haibun will appear in the Fall 2011 Frogpond; “muted sunlight” appeared in the June 2011 issue of The Heron’s Nest and “fine mist” in their September 2011 issue; “daydreaming” and “flickering stars”  both appeared in the June issue of Notes from the Gean; I received a Sakura award in the Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival Haiku Invitational in September of this year for “honor guard”, and in the same month, took third place in the International “Kusamakura” Haiku Competition for “morning mist”. My quest completed, and with twelve haiku contest or journal submissions currently pending, I finally felt ready to apply for my listing.

Haiku North America- Day 2

Starting on Day 2, I realized that what I really needed was a strategy not only to keep from overload, but also to maximize my experience. I have to admit that sleeping in was a huge temptation, but  I didn’t make all the effort to come to the conference just to catch up on my sleep! So with that in mind, I attended the 8 a.m. session of “Tai Chi Ch’uan– Waking Your Haiku Mind”, led by Don Baird. Now I’ve been doing Tai Chi for awhile, but I picked up two major tips that may seem totally obvious, but no one had ever told them to me before. The first was not to lock my knees while doing Tai Chi, something I discovered I do automatically, because I am thinking so hard about my breathing, and what my hands should be doing. The second was to start all movements with the legs; outwardly, that probably wouldn’t even be noticeable to someone looking on, but it makes a big difference in ease of movement. Afterwards, we wrote haiku, inspired by lovely photos taken by Don that were spread around the room.

slow exhale
at the tip of my finger
a butterfly

The conference officially began with opening remarks by Michael Dylan Welch, and a round robin reading of the HNA conference anthology Standing Still. You can read the intro to the anthology here, and a sampling of haiku from it (mine is the 3rd down) here.

Then the hard choices really began in earnest. With three choices for the first session, I opted to attend “Monophilia: The History and Practice of One-Line Haiku in English”, where Jim Kacian did an excellent session on “the two-handed backhand of haiku”, to use his tennis analogy. I have yet to write a monoku myself– my next challenge, I guess– but have been enjoying reading them.

With no break, the next session I attended was “Celebrating 20 Years: Rengay Workshop”, presented by Garry Gay, where we got an intro to writing rengay, and received worksheets for writing 2 and 3 person rengay. We learned that while a rengay required adherence to a particular theme, it also needed to progress through space and time, with shifting points of view. Afterward, over lunch, five of us began attempting our first ever rengay (using the 3 person form), and got a respectable start on it.

After lunch, there was the first panel discussion, of “What Makes Canadian Haiku Canadian”, chaired by Terry Ann Carter, and with panelists Bruce Ross, Jessica Tremblay, and Michael Dylan Welch, where we learned more about haiku on the other side of the border.

We then proceeded to the Monorail station, and rode downtown, where we split into groups to see the sights. I saw Pike Place Market first, followed by the Seattle Art Museum, and had lunch with three others at the Copacabana, a Bolivian restaurant by the Market. We had to do a bit of power walking to catch the last monorail back so we could attend a haibun reading, featuring (among many others) Cor van den Heuvel reading from A Boy’s Seasons: Haibun Memoirs, and Eve Luckring’s video renku. I’ve been playing around with the haibun form a bit, and have five haibun that will shortly appear in Frogpond (2), Notes From the Gean (1), A Hundred Gourds (1), and VoiceCatcher6 (1).

I rounded out my evening with a panel discussion about “Developing Haiku Book Manuscripts”, chaired by Michael Dylan Welch, and with panelists: Jim Kacian, Ce Rosenow, Charles Trumball, and Don Wentworth. This left me with lots of food for thought, as I hope to put a chapbook together someday. This is not so much because I think the world needs another haiku book, but because I have so many haiku kicking around in my various spiral notebooks, and on my computer, that I feel a compelling need to organize them in some cohesive way.

To be continued…