December Haiku Share- Day 21

December Haiku Share

fine mist
he says frogs
I say crickets
— Cara Holman

The Heron’s Nest XIII:3, September 2011

 

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mist
solstice morning
tree frogs croak
— Jone MacCulloch

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of black and white
the raven leaving nothing
but the mist
— Sandi Pray

Daily Haiku Cycle 13, May 2012

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old pond
another year older…
Basho’s frog

from a moonlit stump
the frog is outsprung
by its shadow
Johnny Baranski

(Anthologized in The Blossoming Rudder: Haiku, Senryu, Koans,
and Pithy Sayings 1984-1987 Edited by H.F. Noyes.)

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spring frogs . . .
softening the sound
of traffic
— Peter Newton

(from my haibun “Simple Folds”
in Contemporary Haibun Online, July 2011)

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recalling your silence
as I pass through a valley
full of mist
I wish that I could
lose myself in it
— Alison Williams

Presence #17 May 2002

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silent night
a crickets chirr
breaks the silence
~isabelle loverro

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hazy moon
all the shapes
of a hangover
— Polona Oblak

NFTG 2:4 (March 2011)

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misty morning
fading footprints
on the dewy grass
his ebony shadow lingers
across her frail body
Pamela A. Babusci

12/21/12

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cold moon –
the days of winter
stretch out before me
— Kirsten Cliff

Appeared on Angie Werren’s blog as part of her National Poetry Month 
‘Couplets’ posts, April 2012. See haiga here

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whispered secrets
the mist absorbs
the night
Seánan Forbes

Daily Haiku, Cycle 13

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under the crooked moon—
nothing else is the truth
nor even that mist
— Lech Szeglowski

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morning fog
I’m startled by the splash
of frogs
— angie werren

the zen space — Summer 2012 Showcase

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you remind me
how it felt that night we met . . .
our universe
filled with possibilities
and the soft hum of tree frogs
Margaret Dornaus

Simply Haiku, vol. 9, no.1, Spring 2011

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lavender mist
he murmurs another name
in his sleep
— Christine L. Villa

Shiki Kigo Kukai, November 2012

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pine mist the enso we hold onto from this year to the next
Kathy Uyen Nguyen

see haiga here

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morning dew
and still, a scratchy
cricket song
— Alegria Imperial
LYNX, June 2012

fine mist

December Haiku Share

I wish I had a solstice haiku to share, but I don’t. Anyway, we can’t have a gathering of haiku poets without paying tribute to Basho’s frog. So share a haiku about frogs. Or crickets. Or both. Or mist. (Or the solstice.) Go wild!

fine mist
he says frogs
I say crickets

The Heron’s Nest XIII:3, September 2011


If you missed the initial post, click here to read about the month long haiku challenge I am holding right here on my blog this December.

long night’s moon

Finally  caught up. Today’s  NaHaiWriMo prompt is to write a haiku about the moon. I’ve never counted, but I imagine I’ve penned at least two or three dozen moon haiku, and probably read hundreds more. Why is it that haiku poets never seem to tire of writing about the moon? Perhaps it has something to do with its constant, soothing presence over the years. Even when we don’t see it, we know it’s there.

long night’s moon
I nurse my baby
back to sleep

Interestingly enough, I wrote a moon haiku on June 4th of last year, even though the prompt was “celebrity, papparazzi, or the trappings of fame”, not “moon” at all. (I was in Bend for the HSA quarterly meeting at the time.)

a big frog
in a small pond
full August moon

A Poetry Retrospective- December 2008

So I’ve had this pet project I’ve been meaning to do for awhile. Things seem to have a way of disappearing in cyberspace, and even though I have pages dedicated to listing my online publications, I discovered recently that many of the old links are now defunct. So my idea was to resurrect some of my favorite publications and posts from the past (how’s that for alliteration?) and re-post them here. That sounds easy in theory, but the trick is finding which of my many files and/ or notebooks to look in to find my old works. However, that’s my problem!

My very first published poem (which is no longer online) was “Sleeping With a Open Window”, and it appeared in the online journal Four and Twenty, Volume 1 Issue 2, November/December 2008. I reproduce it in its entirety here:

Sleeping  With an Open Window

Frogs, he says
Crickets, I insist
We stop again to listen.

I wasn’t quite to haiku yet, but was approaching it, with the four & twenty short form developed by Vinnie Kinsella.