waiting room

The January 2013 Shiki Kukai free format topic was “window”.

waiting room
looking out through
rain-streaked windows

 

 

The rest of the entries can be read in the Shiki archives.

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milk moon

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 30

And I did it again! (Made it to the end of another daily PAD challenge.) Today’s prompt is by guest prompter Violet Nesdoly: write a milk poem. I decided to go with another moon haiku– why not?

milk moon
my newborn baby
stirs in my arms

“Moon” is still an autumn kigo technically, although “Milk Moon” was one of several names given to the May full moon by Native Americans, according to the Farmers’ Almanac.  More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

And stay tuned tomorrow for a new idea I had for daily December blog posts that involve my blog readers!

new moon

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 29

Today’s prompt by guest prompter Bonita Jones Knott: write a birth poem. This is sort of a birth poem– a renewal poem anyway:

new moon
starting over again
again

“Moon”, for whatever reason, is an autumn kigo, so autumn it is.  More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

in the hawk’s shadow

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 28

A tough prompt from guest prompter Jonathan Edward Ondrashek, coming just 2 days before the end of the challenge– “Write a poem illuminating how it feels to stand up for what is right in the face of adversity in the workplace”. Hmm. I took a few liberties with defining “workplace”, and wrote the following, based on something I observed this summer.

in the hawk’s shadow…
a mother robin
guards her nest

“Robin” is yet another spring kigo (three in a row, if I remember right!), even though I observed this in the summer. I guess that proves that kigo are more guidelines than anything else. More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

spring’s end

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 27

Today’s Two-for-Tuesday prompt comes from Paula Wanken: write a hero or villain poem. I went with the former:

spring’s end
his folded flag
encased in glass

“spring’s end” is another spring kigo. More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

low-tide beach

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 26

Guest prompter Shann Palmer asked us to write a poem about something we collect. I collect so many things, I hardly knew where to start, but finally settled for seashells.

 

low-tide beach
the clink of seashells
in my hand

“Low-tide beach” is a spring kigo. More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.