time travel

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 12

Today’s intriguing prompt is by Jane Shlensky: “Write about a piece of technology or engineering that does not exist but that should.” It was a little bit tough to do justice to this prompt in 6-12 words, but here goes:

time travel
last year’s robin
back again

“Robin” is a spring kigo.  More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

waking

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 10

Another very creative prompt today, by guest prompter Linda Hofke– one I intend to come back to again when I have more time: “use a foreign word in the title of your poem or in your poem”

waking
to the sound of rain
toujours la même chose

 “Rain” is a winter kigo.  More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

morning fog

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 9

Today’s prompt is to use the phrase “when he’s gone” somewhere in our poem, and the guest prompter was Sally Jadlow. This is my first pass:

morning fog
outside my window…
when he’s gone

I am such a rule follower, I felt like I had to at least try to write exactly to the prompt on my first pass. However, in context, “when he’s gone” sounds somewhat awkward to me. So round #2:

morning fog
outside my window…
after he’s gone

Then I began to wonder if perhaps the 3rd line shouldn’t be moved to the top, as in:

after he’s gone…
morning fog
outside my window

Thoughts, anyone? “Morning fog” is an autumn kigo.  More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

old pond

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 8

Today’s prompt was a very cool one, by guest prompter Daniel Ari: “Talk back to a dead poet. Choose a poem you like by a poet who is no longer living and offer a rebuttal.” There was only one way I could go with this:

Original poem:

old pond…
a frog leaps in
water’s sound

— Matsuo Basho (translated by William Higginson)

My response:

old pond…
after the frog
only ripples

“Frog” is a spring kigo.  For 30 more different translations of Basho’s famous frog poem, check out this page. More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

crescent moon

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 6

Back to today’s prompt: “write a left or right poem”.  The guest prompter was Walt Wojtanik.

crescent moon
things I thought
I’d left behind

“Crescent moon” is an autumn kigo. Interestingly, I thought it would be easier to use kigo from The Haiku Handbook, by William Higginson and Penny Harter, than come up with my own. Turns out it is more difficult, due to the non-haiku nature of many of the Poetic Asides prompts. Still, I think I’ll stick with it– more of a challenge! More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

cold moon

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 4

I had to be a little creative with the prompt today. The prompt was to make the title: “Just Beneath [blank]”, and then fill in the blank and write the poem. But of course, haiku not having titles, this was not possible. My next thought was to make this the first line, but then I lost the short-long-short rhythm of the haiku, and every attempt I made sounded too contrived. So I finally settled on using the phrase “just beneath” anywhere in my haiku, and came up with this: (The guest prompter today was Marie Elena Good.)

 

cold moon
just beneath the crust of snow
more snow

“Cold moon” is a winter  kigo. More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

billowing clouds

It’s always a delight when a new issue of Sketchbook is released. Sketchbook was one of the first journals I successfully submitted to, way back in Spring 2010, and I’ve had haiku appear in every issue since. The kigo for May/June was “cloud peaks” / “billowing clouds” . Here are my three:

billowing clouds
the wind shifts
a flock of swallows

a fire-breathing dragon
morphs into a sheep…
billowing clouds

billowing clouds
the first raindrops
hit the pavement