dragonfly

The prompt for NaHaiWriMo today is dragonfly. The first haiku is new, the others are recent haiku I’ve also written about dragonflies.

dragonfly
this moment
now
(NaHaiWriMo)

low clouds
dragonflies hover
above the pond
(Sketchbook thread, Mar/Apr 2012)

dragonfly wings
hovering my cursor
over the Like button
(Prune Juice #7, Winter 2012)

first impressions
a dragonfly hovers
before landing
(Dragonfly Dreams, August 2011)

Frost Flowers

The haiku thread for the January/February 2012 Sketchbook journal was “precious gems”. At first I was totally stumped. Everything I wrote seemed too flowery. And then I got the idea to stick with diamonds, and write a sequence of haiku that chronicled my history with that gem. This seemed to be particulary fitting, as my husband and I approach our 30th anniversary later this month. I submitted these as individual haiku in the Sketchbook thread, but present them here as a sequence, which is how I wrote them.

Frost Flowers

frost flowers
the sparkling allure
of diamonds

only one question
only one answer
diamond ring

picking out
a diamond solitaire…
together

first anniversary
the glint of her diamond
undiminished

princess party
her diamond tiara
and jewel-encrusted scepter

thirtieth anniversary
he gives her books
instead of pearls

morning dew
the foreverness
of diamonds

Old Calendar

The kigo for the Sketchbook November/ December 2011 kukai was “old calendar”. I don’t know if other people also save their old calendars like I do, but I love having a record of the past, for what it’s worth. Those little minutiae of life are all duly recorded for posterity,  in the little white squares.

winter deepens –
old calendar pages
completely filled

taking down
my old calendar…
reflected moonlight

fallen blossoms
of the Christmas cactus
old calendar

More December Journal Releases

December seems to be the month for new journal releases! First there was A Hundred Gourds, then The Heron’s Nest, Sketchbook, and now Notes from the Gean. The latter has been completely overhauled, and is full of essays and interviews, as well as haiku, tanka, haiga, and haibun. I know what I will be doing this weekend (and probably next weekend, and the weekend after that too!)

Two of my haiku appear (on page 33) in this issue:

winter garden
my father’s books
mixed in with mine

snowshoe hare
his footsteps
too big to fill