earthshine

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 24

My favorite kind of prompt is one which prompts me to learn something new in order to write it.Today’s prompt, by Amanda Fall was of this type. The prompt was to write a poem with the title “The Truth about [blank]”. I immediately thought of the moon, and while googling some facts about the moon to make sure what I said was correct, I discovered this fascinating NASA article about earthshine. I have witnessed this phenomena in the past, and wondered about it– now I know!

This was the evolution of my haiku, from my first pass, through a 3rd version (which lost “the truth about” phrase entirely). I’m interested to see which version others prefer.

the truth
about the moon
reflected sunlight

earthshine
the truth
about the moon

earthshine
the dark side
of the moon

“Moon”, without a preceding modifying adjective,  is an autumn kigo. More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

deep cold

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 23

We’re coming into the home stretch on the PAD challenge, and I must say this month has flown by! Usually by this point, I’m starting to lose inspiration, but I think because I chose to write in haiku this year (which I’m starting to think in!), my task is much easier than in past years where I tried to write in a wide variety of poetic forms each day. Today’s prompt, by Amanda Fall was to write a “deep” poem.

deep cold
the last sliver
of pie unclaimed

“Deep cold” is a winter kigo. Interestingly, The Haiku Handbook lists winter as November, December, and January, so my post-Thanksgiving haiku fits right in here. More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

breaking dawn

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 22

Today’s prompt ( by Brenda Bishop Blakely) is somewhat daunting: to write about paradise. A bit of a tall order, considering I have approximately 6 – 10 words to dedicate to the task. So I will just write about something nice I experienced this morning instead.

On this Thanksgiving, as on all other Thanksgiving, I like to pause to think about those things, both large and small, that I am grateful for. What comes into my mind immediately are family, friends, community, and the amazing world of nature in which we live. As I looked out my (second story) bedroom window this morning, I found myself almost eye-to-eye with a very large squirrel, who had climbed out to the outermost branches near the top of our Japanese maple. I’ve always marveled at the gravity-defying acrobatic feats of squirrels, but this was one of the most daring I had ever witnessed. The sight of an obviously well-fed squirrel balancing his considerable weight on pencil thin branches to eat the dried maple seeds that still clung to the branches made me smile. Perhaps I am anthropomorphizing a bit much to say the squirrel is grateful for the abundant seeds, nuts, and bulbs it readily finds in our yard, but it reminded me that in spite of obstacles, my family, along with all the fauna in our neighborhood, is pretty well provided for this Thanksgiving Day. Wishing everyone who celebrates it a very Happy Thanksgiving, and for those who don’t, a happy day of reflecting on gratitudes instead. In spite of the considerable rain, the bare tree branches, the seemingly never-ending piles of soggy leaves to rake, and the shorter days, November still has much to offer. I guess my idea of paradise, to get back to the prompt, is a world in which everyone gets what they need, including our animal friends.

 

breaking dawn
a gray squirrel balances
on bare branches

The closest I can find to “bare branches” in The Haiku Handbook is “tree leaves fall”, an autumn kigo. More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

Thanksgiving Ku

Today’s Poetic Asides prompt was to write a gathering poem. Given all I have to do today, I went with a haiku (or three). Happy Thanksgiving to all my online friends who celebrate it (and happy day to all who don’t). I’m grateful for all of you!

in diminished numbers
we gather…
still we give thanks

storm clouds gathering
outside my window…
warmth within

turkey bones gathering
on our plates…
full to bursting


Over the River

Today’s Poetic Asides prompt was to write a travel poem. With all that’s going on, I felt I needed to try something I could write reasonably quickly, so I went with a sevenling again. I added a bit of rhyme scheme to it, to make it more interesting.

 

Over the River

They travel here
from far and near
and all points in between

to feast on turkey
and sip some chai
and reminisce over pumpkin pie

and make plans for next year.

2010 November PAD- Day 20

The prompt today is to write a “what’s wrong or right” poem. I decided to write my first pantoum. In fact, I got so into the mechanics of the pantoum that I almost forgot the prompt in the process!

A White Thanksgiving

With Thanksgiving but five days away
an icy chill is in the air
clouds are gathering, fleecy and gray
though snow before Thanksgiving is rare.

An icy chill is in the air,
it’s time to batten down the hatches
though snow before Thanksgiving is rare
and leaves cling from the trees in patches.

It’s time to batten down the hatches
the weather turned cold overnight
and leaves cling from the trees in patches
I wonder, is the weatherman right?

The weather turned cold overnight
they say snow is on its way
I wonder, is the weatherman right
or will we hold winter at bay?

They say snow is on its way
clouds are gathering, fleecy and gray,
or will we hold winter at bay,
with Thanksgiving but five days away?