The Trouble is in the Rime

I couldn’t resist writing a triolet today for the Poetic Asides Poem-a-Day Challenge. The prompt was to make the title: “The Trouble is [blank]”, and then write the poem.

The Trouble is in the Rime

Sometimes when you write a triolet
you end up with imperfect rhymes
and your best intentions go astray.
Sometimes when you write a triolet
you realize you have more to say
but you’ve just run out of lines.
Sometimes when you write a triolet
you end up with imperfect rhymes.

Poem in Your Pocket Day Celebration

April 26 has been designated national Poem in your Pocket Day.

And what clever poet friends I have. In this post you will find haiku, haiga, a limerick, a triolet, a Fibonacci, an ovillejo, and other short and long form poetry. Click on the name of each poem to read it. And enjoy!

Cara Holman: summer butterfly

Christine L. Villa: crawling

Madeleine Begun Kane: Limerick Quest

Merrill Gonzales: nor’easter predicted

Ellen Grace Olinger: Saturday Poem

Symanntha Renn: grass that used to be green

Alegria Imperial: Light as Magic

Ina Roy-Faderman: Mockingbird

Bruce W. Niedt: Big Picture

Kirsten Cliff: At the Graveyard

De Jackson: O, Let’s Not

Gillena Cox: End of April

And be sure to check out these two other Poem in Your Pocket blog posts, that I contributed to:

“A Poem in Your Pocket 2012” on Gillena Cox’s Lunch Break blog.

“Poem in Your Pocket Day…” on Margaret Dornaus’ Haiku-doodle blog.

And two more poems:

Merrill Gonzales: “I forget my lips are roughed, at the clear water.”  by Chiyojo (1703-1775)

Jacqueline Hallenbeck:

“Three Little Pigs in a Blanket”

Three Little Pigs in a Blanket
crashed a pajama party.
One started playing the trumpet.
Three Little Pigs in a Blanket
pulled out a rope and tried to jump it.
Their names were Zeik, Bo and Marty.
Three Little Pigs in a Blanket
crashed a pajama party.

(c) jh 4/20/12

A Triolet a Day

Today’s Poetic Asides prompt was to write a “best ever” poem. Robert Lee Brewer wrote his as a triolet, so I just had to come up with a triolet response:

A Triolet a Day

When I wrote my first triolet
I got stuck on the rhyme
and struggled with what to say
when I wrote my first triolet.
Be the best form ever, I think it may
and I write them all the time.
When I wrote my first triolet
I got stuck on the rhyme.

And here is the first (or maybe almost first) triolet I wrote, that I was referring to:

Stacking Up

To write a perfect triolet,
first focus on the rhyme.
Then think of something pithy to say,
to write a perfect triolet.
If you’re not careful, get stuck you may,
it happens all the time.
To write a perfect triolet,
first focus on the rhyme.

You can read my original post here.

Sticky Web

Today’s Poetic Asides prompt was to write an excess poem. I went with a triolet:

Sticky Web

I would surf the internet all day
if I had all day to spend.
Who wants to work when you can play?
I would surf the internet all day!
There are friends to skype, and things to say—
the fun would never end.
I would surf the internet all day
if I had all day to spend.

Sort of Sunny

After I read the Poetic Aside daily prompt, I went to the gym, got on the recumbent bike with my notepad and pen, and started writing poetry while pedaling. Two birds with one stone, so to speak. Again, I really liked today’s prompt, and will bookmark it for later use. We had to make the title of the poem “Sort of [blank]”, fill in the blank with a word or phrase of our choice, and then take it from there. As usual, I went with my first instinct, but there were so many other things I thought of to write about.

The soundless bank of  TVs in the front of the room caught my eye, and one of them had the seven day weather forecast on the screen. Just how many different ways can you say “rain”?  I also decided I wanted to write a triolet, and what is impressive about my effort, if I say so myself, is that I wrote it based on a vague recollection of what the rhyme scheme for a triolet was (turned out I got it right), and without the aid of my trusty online rhyming dictionary. In other words, I had to painstakingly make lists in my notebook of rhyming words the old-fashioned way. My weather triolet:

Sort of Sunny

The weatherman says sort of sunny,
bees and honey, and all that jazz.
Yet it’s raining now and not at all funny
the weatherman says sort of sunny.
His predictions are never right on the money
but does that stop all his razzamatazz?
The weatherman says sort of sunny,
bees and honey, and all that jazz.

Check out this write-up of the triolet, if you want to try your hand at one yourself. Once you have the first two lines down, you’re 5/8 of the way there, due to the line repetition scheme. Just beware how you pick the last two words of these two starting lines, because every other line will have to rhyme with one of them!

2010 November PAD- Day 18

Today’s PAD prompt is to write a “lost & found” poem. I went with a third consecutive triolet, my current favorite form. (After haiku, that is!)

Nothing is Lost

I wish I could make myself believe
that all is remembered, and nothing is lost;
that my memories, I can always retrieve,
I wish I could make myself believe.
By taking snapshots, I hope to achieve
a way of keeping memories embossed,
I wish I could make myself believe
That all is remembered, and nothing is lost.

2010 November PAD- Day 17

PAD, Day 17. Today’s prompt was to make the title “Tell Me Why (Blank)”, then write the poem. I went with a triolet again.

Tell Me Why

I often wish I could figure out why
I can’t get my teen to converse.
Half the time he forgets to reply,
I often wish I could figure out why
he can text ten friends in the blink of an eye,
but when I ask how his day went, he’s terse.
I often wish I could figure out why
I can’t get my teen to converse.