the wide sea

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 25

I guess I’m getting quite a late start today. Guest prompter Cameron Mathews asked us to write an “opposite poem” of one of our earlier poetic attempts in this month. I decided to revisit Day 18, where I wrote a modified glosa/ epigram poem. Of course, I had to change all the rules of the form for this attempt.

I again started with the Shiki haiku on page 24 of The Haiku Handbook, by William J. Higginson and Penny Harter. This time, I used the lines from Shiki’s haiku in opposite order, and made them the first lines of my haiku (rather than the last lines). It’s easier to write the new haiku sequence than explain it!

rowing through
out of the mist
the wide sea

— Shiki

My Day 18 poem:

only the sound
of oars in water
rowing through

so far away
mountains rise
out of the mist

alone
with my thoughts
the wide sea

And today’s “opposite” poem:

the wide sea
thinking of you
so far away

out of the mist
white sails
or maybe a seagull

rowing through…
waves lap the shore
at my feet

More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

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rowing through

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 18

A tough prompt today for someone who is trying to write daily haiku!  Guest prompter Carol Stephen asked us to write a glosa poem. I decided to adhere to the spirit of the prompt, rather than the precise form, so I modified the challenge a bit. I used a Shiki haiku as an epigram, and then wrote a sequence of three haiku, in which the final line of each haiku is a line from Shiki’s haiku (in order). I dropped the rhyming requirement entirely. I found the Shiki haiku on page 24 of The Haiku Handbook, by William J. Higginson and Penny Harter. It is one of my favorites.

rowing through
out of the mist
the wide sea

— Shiki

My “modified glosa”:

only the sound
of oars in water
rowing through

so far away
mountains rise
out of the mist

alone
with my thoughts
the wide sea

More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

so near

2012 November PAD Chapbook Challenge- Day 2

I love writing about the full moon– what haiku poet doesn’t? I almost used the haiku I wrote a few days ago for the Haiku Bandit Society October moon viewing party, but decided that would be cheating. For this challenge, only fresh work, and the kigo has to come from The Haiku Handbook, by William J. Higginson and Penny Harter. Those are the rules I set for myself, so I think it only fair I follow them!

Today’s prompt was “full moon”, and the guest prompter was Khara House:

so near
and yet so far
hazy moon

“Hazy moon” is a spring kigo, by the way. More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.

2012 Poetic Asides PAD November Chapbook Challenge

I seem to write in burst these days. There were many deadlines for haiku/ senryu submissions in August, and that kept me going for a good long time. I have  also been writing rengay, and collaborative photo haiga, and that added impetus to my writings recently. So I was hesitant about taking on another daily writing challenge. But I have participated in the Poetic Asides PAD November Chapbook Challenge for three years running now, and don’t want to give it up. Thus I am going to try to make it easy on myself. I will follow the prompts and write haiku, using a kigo from The Haiku Handbook, by William J. Higginson and Penny Harter, as either my first or last line. That means I should only have to write a two-line, single  phrase jux a day. Hoping I can make it through all 30 days! Follow along here, and on Facebook.

Today’s prompt was “matches”, and the guest prompter was Mariya Koleva:

a faded number
on the matchbox cover
winter clouds

More poetic responses can be read on the Poetic Asides blog.